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composite lighting columns

The other day I was speaking with an acquaintance in passing who told me of a really cool architectural trick used by the University of British Columbia in their library. He explained that the undergraduate library was underground some 4-stories, but it had giant columns bringing the light in through large telescope-like mirrors inside and then brought into the room. That is a pretty smart idea for natural lighting, and wise considering that students would be in there for hours reading and artificial light is problematic for long periods of time, it is not good for your biological system, especially hard on the eyes.

Okay so, bringing in UV light is a very wise idea, so maybe we can use this strategy for another important challenge in our civilization, namely the MRSA issues in our hospitals. We all know that MRSA hides in the cracks and crevices where light doesn’t shine, and it can grow there better than anywhere else. This of course doesn’t mean that we don’t need to clean the handles, sterilize hospital rooms, and be careful with things such as TV remote controls, gloves, or anything else. Hospitals have protocols for things like this, and those procedures must be kept in place for safety.

Nevertheless piping in lighting columns, real UV light into a hospital room is a very wise choice. Having some sort of retractable telescopes bringing in light in all four corners of the room ensuring that the UV light gets everywhere would make a lot of sense. It wouldn’t be very difficult either. Another strategy might be to have modulated LED light and UV light (real sunlight) in hospital rooms, perhaps during cleaning procedures when the room is void of patients as a way to make sure it is ready for human inhabitants, as part of a best management practice, all done on a periodic timetable.

UV light is also important for folks who might have been vitamin D deficient and it might be very good for patients who are stuck in hospital rooms for long periods of time under artificial light. All of these things should be considered and a telescopic UV light columns strategy could work wonders for an anti-MRSA procedural process. No, this won’t take the place of cleaning, rather it would be in addition to all of that because we haven’t licked the problem yet, and cleaning alone doesn’t seem to be working. Indeed I hope you will please consider all this and think on it.

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